...never judge a book by its movie

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Mailbox Monday/In My Mailbox - February 26, 2012


"Mailbox Monday" is the brainchild of Marcia and set up on its own blog here:  http://mailboxmonday.wordpress.com/

February's host is Metroreader!   Hop on over, link up, and join the fun!

"In My Mailbox" is hosted by The Story Siren

Every week we'll post about what books we have that week (via your mailbox/library/store bought)! Everyone that agrees to participate will try to visit each other's list and leave comments!  Everyone is welcome to join! You can join at anytime and you DO NOT have to participate every week.

I guarantee that you will add to your reading list by visiting the participating blogs in both of these memes!

I didn't receive any new review books (although I did download some galleys to my Net Galley queue).  I did buy some books (for upcoming book club discussions and a couple for my reading challenges):

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen - I bought this last year and didn't get a chance to read it.  Middle Bebe Girl Jasmine borrowed it.  Then she lost it.  So I bought it again last week.  Not-So-Bebe-Girl Autumn was visiting from college this weekend.  She borrowed it.  I still haven't read it.  I hope it makes it back.

Goodreads description:

An atmospheric, gritty, and compelling novel of star-crossed lovers, set in the circus world circa 1932, by the bestselling author of "Riding Lessons."

 "Gritty, sensual and charged with dark secrets involving love, murder and a majestic, mute heroine (Rosie the Elephant)."Q"Parade."

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

Goodreads description:

Berlin 1942

When Bruno returns home from school one day, he discovers that his belongings are being packed in crates. His father has received a promotion and the family must move from their home to a new house far far away, where there is no one to play with and nothing to do. A tall fence running alongside stretches as far as the eye can see and cuts him off from the strange people he can see in the distance.

But Bruno longs to be an explorer and decides that there must be more to this desolate new place than meets the eye. While exploring his new environment, he meets another boy whose life and circumstances are very different to his own, and their meeting results in a friendship that has devastating consequences.


The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield 

Goodreads description:

Reclusive author Vida Winter, famous for her collection of twelve enchanting stories, has spent the past six decades penning a series of alternate lives for herself. Now old and ailing, she is ready to reveal the truth about her extraordinary existence and the violent and tragic past she has kept secret for so long. Calling on Margaret Lea, a young biographer troubled by her own painful history, Vida disinters the life she meant to bury for good. Margaret is mesmerized by the author’s tale of Gothic strangeness—featuring the beautiful and willful Isabelle, the feral twins Adeline and Emmeline, a ghost, a governess, a topiary garden and a devastating fire. Together, Margaret and Vida confront the ghosts that have haunted them while becoming, finally, transformed by the truth themselves.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

Goodreads description:

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the color yellow.  

This improbable story of Christopher's quest to investigate the suspicious death of a neighborhood dog makes for one of the most captivating, unusual, and widely heralded novels in recent years.


A Clockwork Orange by Anthony BurgessA Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

Goodreads description:

A vicious fifteen-year-old "droog" is the central character of this 1963 classic, whose stark terror was captured in Stanley Kubrick's magnificent film of the same title. In Anthony Burgess's nightmare vision of the future, where criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. When the state undertakes to reform Alex—to "redeem" him—the novel asks, "At what cost?" This edition includes the controversial last chapter not published in the first edition and Burgess's introduction "A Clockwork Orange Resucked."

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Goodreads description:

Barcelona, 1945—Just after the war, a great world city lies in shadow, nursing its wounds, and a boy named Daniel awakes one day to find that he can no longer remember his mother’s face. To console his only child, Daniel’s widowed father, an antiquarian book dealer, initiates him into the secret of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a library tended by Barcelona’s guild of rare-book dealers as a repository for books forgotten by the world, waiting for someone who will care about them again.

Daniel’s father coaxes him to choose a book from the spiraling labyrinth of shelves, one that, it is said, will have a special meaning for him. And Daniel so loves the book he selects, a novel called The Shadow of the Wind by one Julián Carax, that he sets out to find the rest of Carax’s work. To his shock, he discovers that someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book this author has written. In fact, he may have the last of Carax’s books in existence.

Before Daniel knows it, his seemingly innocent quest has opened a door into one of Barcelona’s darkest secrets, an epic story of murder, magic, madness, and doomed love, and before long he realizes that if he doesn’t find out the truth about Julián Carax, he and those closest to him will suffer horribly


What goodies arrived in YOUR house this week?  Please feel free leave a link to YOUR "In My Mailbox/Mailbox Monday" post in the comments (I'd love to come visit) or simply comment with what your reading week was like!

Julie



14 comments:

  1. Enjoy all your new reads! Water for Elephants and the Thirteenth Tale are favorites of mine.

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  2. You have some classics here. The Thirteenth Tale is the one that is new to me. Enjoy them all.

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  3. I've read all of those except Curious Incident and loved them all except A Clockwork Orange. You've got some good reading ahead of you!

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  4. You have a few books here that pull at my heart, one for sure is The Boy In The Stryped Pajamas. Fantastic book.... painfully real.

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  5. Hi Julie -- I've read all of your new books except A Clockwork Orange. Hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

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  6. So many good books I don't even know where to start! My sister says The Shadow of the Wind is one of her all time favorites. I loved Water for Elephants. Enjoy!

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  7. Ha, I hope you get to read Water For Elephants at some point. I loved the book, not so much - the film.
    I really liked The Shadow of the Wind.

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  8. These books all look awesome. I still haven't read Water for Elephants, though hope to at some point this year.

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  9. Seems like you have some good upcoming book club discussions :)

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  10. Looks like some good reading ahead.

    http://tributebooksmama.blogspot.com/2012/02/mailbox-monday_27.html

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  11. Water for Elephants is awesome and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is a 'must read' in my mind. I read the Dog in the Night-time with my book group, and although I really enjoyed it, many of the ladies in my group did not. I will be looking forward to your thoughts on this one!

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  12. Julie, I should read Water for Elephants--it's been on my list for too long now! I hope you enjoy your new books.

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  13. I hope you enjoy Water for Elephants as much as I did!

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