...never judge a book by its movie

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Spring Serenity Read-a-Thon Day 3

Spring Serenity Read-a-Thon
The Spring Serenity Read-a-Thon is being hosted by Michelle at The True Book Addict and runs from April 25th through May 1st.  There's still time to join in on the mini-challenges and prizes, as you can join in anytime through the week, reading as much or as little as you'd like.  I'm hosting a mini-challenge here as well, with a chance to win!

I'm currently reading (clicking cover will take you to the Goodreads page):

The Dragon's Path by Daniel Abraham - on page 382 with 261 pages read during the read-a-thon

--Page 69:  For almost a week, the caravan had been making good progress.  The road was well traveled, local farmers keeping it for the most part clean, but there had still been whole leagues where their way was covered in newly fallen leaves.  The rustling of horses' hooves and the crackle of the cartwheels had been loud enough to drown out conversation.  The 'van master wasn't bad for a religious.  For the most part, Marcus could ignore the scriptures read over the evening meals.  If the Timzinae happened to pick something particularly hard to listen to - sermons on family or children or the assurance that God was just or anything that touched too closely on what had happened to his wife and daughter - Marcus ate quickly and took a long private walk out ahead on the road.  He called it scouting, and the 'van master didn't take offense.  Other travelers had joined with the 'van and parted again without more than a look from Yardem or himself to keep the peace.  Except that they weren't yet a quarter of the way to the pass that marked the edge of Birancour, the job was going better than expected.
Marcus chewed his last bite of sausage slowly.  The dozen carts filled half the clearing, horses and mules with feedbags over their heads or else being led to and from the brook to drink.  The carters knew their business for the most part.  The old man driving the tin ore was a little deaf and the boy with the high cart of wool cloth was either new to the trade or an idiot or both, but they were the worst.  And his acting troupe had worked out magnificently.  If he looked at the trees, not considering the people at all, he could still pick out the guards in the sides of his vision, just by their swagger.
By the side of the road, the long-haired woman, Cary, stood with her arms crossed and a huge horn-and-sinew bow slung across her back.  Likely she couldn't have drawn the damned thing, but she wore it like the companion of years.  Sandr, the young lead, walked among the carts, head high and brow furrowed.

Finished today:

Chime by Franny Billingsley

--Page 69:  "I don't have the swamp cough."  Rose came into focus.  She smiled her anxious-monkey smile, which is the only smile she knows how to make.
"Of course you don't," I said, just as Rose hunched herself into her chest for a comfortable paroxysm of coughing. What exquisite timing.  If she weren't Rose, you might think she was indulging herself in a paradox.  In a paroxysm of paradoxysm.
But she is Rose.
"It's time for the funeral-baked meats," said Rose, squeezing her words past the last crumbs of cough.
"Right you are, Rose."  We were alone in the graveyard.  Even Eldric, the newcomer, knew that every good mourner makes merry in the Alehouse with roast pork, and pies, and funeral biscuits, and sherry and ale.  Especially the sherry and ale.  A funeral is a thirsty piece of business.
I was dizzy and seasick.  "Give me a minute."
"People can't give minutes," said Rose.
Rose, literal Rose.  "It's just one of those things people say.  We talked about that, remember, when Father tried to catch the barkeep's eye?"
"Quick!" said Rose, all in a rush.  "Cover your ears!"
I clapped my hands to my ears, pretending I couldn't hear the church bells chime twelve o'clock.  Rose has a peculiar relationship to the notion of time:  She won't let me listen to the clock strike twelve.  I can't say why - I've told her often enough that I like the hour of noon - but there's no understanding Rose.
"It's time for the funeral-baked meats."
"Off we go, then."  We be asking you for help, girl what can hear ghosts.

BOOKS READ (click the cover to go to the Goodreads page):

The Sandalwood Tree by Elle Newmark
Last 254 pages 
Changeless by Gail Carriger
374 pages
Chime by Franny Billingsley
361 pages

My Book Retreat's Mini-Challenge is the Page 69 Test, so I've included page 69 of the new books here.  The premise of the Page 69 Test is that a reader can turn to page 69 of any book and use that page to judge whether or not they will like the rest of the book.

Read-a-thon progress:  
Total books read:  2 1/2
Total pages read:  989 pages
Goal:  Read 5 from my personal TBR pile:

            1. Changeless by Gail Carriger

Next to be read:  Blameless by Gail Carriger

Woot!  Are YOU participating?  If you are, please leave a link to your progress post so I can come and cheer you on!
Julie

2 comments:

  1. Wow! You're a fast reader! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. You are doing SO great, Julie! I'm so proud of my little read-a-thon-ers! I'm hoping to catch up tonight and tomorrow and then back to moving again Saturday. Hopefully, Saturday night and Sunday, I'll have more time. *fingers crossed* Happy Reading!

    P.S. The page 69s sound interesting!

    ReplyDelete

Comments make me feel all squishy happy inside, so drop a line if you see or read something interesting! PLEASE don't leave links to your blog or page unless the post you're replying to specifically asks you to leave a link!
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